Knights.

To share knowledge about the world and links to useful resources.

Re: Knights.

Postby Harroghty » Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:01 am

The Paladin's Virtues

The paladin's virtues are:

    An organized approach brings the most good for all.

    Laws exist to bring prosperity to those under them.

    Unjust laws must be overturned or changed in a reasonable and positive fashion.

    People rule; laws help.

    Cause the most good through the least harm.

    Protect the weak.

    Goodness is not a natural state, but must be fought for to be attained and maintained.

    Lead by example.

    Let your deeds speak your intentions.

    Goodness radiates from the heart.

    Give others your mercy, but keep your wits about you.

Ed Greenwood and Jeff Grubb, A Grand Tour of the Realms (Lake Geneva: TSR, 1993), 15.



This short list of paladin virtues is from A Grand Tour of the Realms and offers another example of a paladin's ethos. I like especially the last line! It reminds me of a quote from a great general. General James Mattis, appropriately nicknamed 'the warrior monk', said told his Marines to "be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet".

Remember that your paladin's ethos should be derived from their church, even though we have a set of virtues taught at the Halls of Justice to those squire students. In other words: your paladin's ethos is open to interpretation, but should be developed in keeping with canon dogma for his deity and in agreement with his church leadership.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
User avatar
Harroghty
Staff
Staff
 
Posts: 8830
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:38 pm

Re: Knights.

Postby Alitar » Fri Jul 27, 2012 1:36 pm

These posts make me want to go and retrieve my collection of 3.0/3.5 books from New Brunswick. >.>

4,760 km, 62 hours
Trans-Canada Hwy

According to google it's not too far. >.> :(
"The noir hero is a knight in blood caked armour. He's dirty and he does his best to deny the fact that he's a hero the whole time."
~Frank Miller
User avatar
Alitar
Sword Grand Master
Sword Grand Master
 
Posts: 1005
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:40 am
Location: Canada

Re: Knights.

Postby Harroghty » Fri Oct 26, 2012 9:57 pm

We gamers often take for granted that physical training is a necessary part of being an effective combatant. No one (mostly no one) role-plays the hours of intensive physical training and practice necessary for their player character (PC) to be the champion that he is. First, that kind of thing can be boring to role-play, and secondly, we often forget that while the warriors of yesterday did prepare their bodies for combat, even if they did not have fancy running shoes, expensive weights, or well-stocked gymnasiums.

The Romans understood the necessity of being fit for combat and left a detailed record of how to become so. The Roman author Publius Flavius Vegetius Renatus (Vegetius) wrote two books read by most professional commanders in the Middle Ages and they described the Roman methods. These were not only the classic Greco-Roman fitness ideals of running, swimming, and jumping, but included specific guidance for war. They described how young men of the legions were issued double-weight shields and swords to practice the armatura (Roman combat drills) so that they would be all the more capable with their proper equipment.

Medieval commanders, knights, and tutors sustained the idea of integrating physical exertion into training for war. This could just be practice of military skills to exertion; squires might wrestle and spar in order to develop "hardness of the body" (Aegidius Romanus). It could also be the practicing of military skills under an increased burden or under duress as the Romans recommended. Jean Le Meingre, Charles VI of France's marshall, submitted his warriors to a regiment wherein they practiced scaling walls in armor and leaping onto horseback armored. This practice is echoed by famous medieval author-commanders such as Dom Duarte, king of Portugal, who advocated leaping into the saddle while wearing armor. Geoffry de Charny, standard bearer of Jean II of France, had his squires practice skills in armor so that they would not be "handicapped by being thus constricted".

While many medieval warriors and scholars alike could agree with Cervantes's statement that "force is overcome by art," it would be the rare one who did not also agree that force was a big help.

Knights, be they paladins or otherwise, are professional soldiers who would have a vested interest in being well prepared for combat. Some of these could be interesting for other PCs as well: I imagine fighters drilling before a competition or maybe an interesting feature for a new fighter's guild. Here are some specific examples of historical exercises (some of which could make for some fun event or area building ideas):

    -leap into the saddle (armored or unarmored, on a real horse or a wooden one)
    -run or walk long distances (sometimes adding the vaulting of obstacles)
    -strike a pell with your chosen weapon
    -somersault in armor
    -dance in armor
    -ride a horse
    -wrestle
    -joust
    -lift and throw stones
    -throw javelins or lances
    -scale walls in armor
    -fight with staves
    -tug-o-war

Sources:

"The Role of Fitness in Historical Fencing", accessed October 25, 2012, http://www.thearma.org/essays/fit/RennFit.htm

Geoffrey de Charny, A Knight's Own Book of Chivalry, trans. Elspeth Kennedy (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005).
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
User avatar
Harroghty
Staff
Staff
 
Posts: 8830
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:38 pm

Re: Knights.

Postby Orplar » Tue Mar 19, 2013 10:13 pm

Some of you may find this interesting. I love the 'stuff you should know' podcasts

http://www.stuffyoushouldknow.com/podca ... ghts-work/
"Be bold and let your feet guide you upon your own path. With any Luck, you'll wind up in a fabulous place. Work upon your skills, perfect them. You will be rewarded as you want" - Orplar Leafall, Lucks Guide
Orplar
Sword Grand Master
Sword Grand Master
 
Posts: 633
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2005 4:33 pm
Location: Forests of Fearun

Re: Knights.

Postby Larethiel » Sun Aug 25, 2013 10:11 am

Stuart W. Pyhrr, Donald J. LaRocca, Dirk H. Breiding

The armored Horse in Europe 1480-1620, New York 2005.

Pdf available at
http://libmma.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15324coll10/id/121762
Wir stolze Menschenkinder
Sind eitel arme Sünder
Und wissen gar nicht viel,
Wir spinnen Luftgespinste
Und suchen viele Künste
Und kommen weiter von dem Ziel.
User avatar
Larethiel
Sword Grand Master
Sword Grand Master
 
Posts: 891
Joined: Sat Jul 22, 2006 4:10 pm
Location: Mt. Whateverest

Re: Knights.

Postby Aldren » Wed Jun 11, 2014 4:16 pm

A great read on chivalry by Leon Gautier, if you've got time for 500ish pages.

http://www.strobertbellarmine.net/books/Gautier--Chivalry.pdf
"He served, but found no pride in service. He fought, but took no joy in victory. He drank, to drown his pain in a sea of wine... ...It was hate that drove him. Though he committed many sins, he never sought forgiveness."
User avatar
Aldren
Sword Grand Master
Sword Grand Master
 
Posts: 632
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2006 6:25 am

Re: Knights.

Postby Aldren » Sun Jun 22, 2014 4:48 am

Image
"He served, but found no pride in service. He fought, but took no joy in victory. He drank, to drown his pain in a sea of wine... ...It was hate that drove him. Though he committed many sins, he never sought forgiveness."
User avatar
Aldren
Sword Grand Master
Sword Grand Master
 
Posts: 632
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2006 6:25 am

Re: Knights.

Postby Harroghty » Tue Nov 07, 2017 9:01 pm

It has been some time since I've updated this. Here's a great video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-bnM5SuQkI) based upon the recorded deeds of Boucicaut (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Le_Maingre).

Please read my last post for more detail here, but this video neatly underlines the beauty of plate armor, specifically that the weight is distributed. Compare a suit of plate armor, to full mail armor, to modern body armor ..they all weigh about the same, about ~80 lbs / 36 kb. We tend to judge more harshly the medieval armor because it covered more of the body, but being often bespoke and being highly articulated, it did so with a great actual range of movement.
"A man may die yet still endure if his work enters the greater work, for time is carried upon a current of forgotten deeds, and events of great moment are but the culmination of a single carefully placed thought." - Chime of Eons
User avatar
Harroghty
Staff
Staff
 
Posts: 8830
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2004 5:38 pm

Previous

Return to World

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest